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Adv Chronic Kidney Dis. 2018 Nov;25(6):519-522. doi: 10.1053/j.ackd.2018.08.014.

Women in Nephrology Leadership.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL; Department of Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR. Electronic address: Wendy-brown@northwestern.edu.
2
Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL; Department of Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR.

Abstract

Women and men tend to take different paths to leadership, with men being more intentional. When women do undertake leadership activities, they tend to be surprised by how much they enjoy it. Women's leadership styles tend to be more collaborative and inclusive. Women are used to multitasking and tend to persist under difficult circumstances. The nephrology manpower crisis affects both men and women, although some of the drivers are different. There is a persistent and well-known pay disparity between men and women physicians that many have tried to address without consistent success. Strategies also need to be developed to support and encourage both men and women in nephrology.

KEYWORDS:

Leadership; Nephrology; Women

PMID:
30527552
DOI:
10.1053/j.ackd.2018.08.014

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