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IDCases. 2018 Nov 28;14:e00472. doi: 10.1016/j.idcr.2018.e00472. eCollection 2018.

Anaplasmosis: An emerging tick-borne disease of importance in Canada.

Author information

1
Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, Max Rady College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.
2
Cadham Provincial Laboratory, Government of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.
3
Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, Max Rady College of Medicine, Department of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.
4
Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, Max Rady College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Medical Oncology and Hematology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.
5
CancerCare Manitoba, Department of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.
6
Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, Max Rady College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, Section of Infectious Diseases, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.
7
Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, Max Rady College of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Infectious Diseases, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.
8
Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, Max Rady College of Medicine, Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.
9
Public Health Agency of Canada, National Microbiology Laboratory, Zoonotic Diseases and Special Pathogens, Winnipeg, MB, Canada.

Abstract

Human Granulocytic Anaplasmosis (HGA) is an infection caused by the intracellular bacterium Anaplasma phagocytophilum. As a tick-borne disease, the public health impact of HGA continues to increase with range expansion of the disease vector. The clinical presentation of HGA is often a non-specific febrile illness. The presence of leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and mild hepatic injury are frequently noted on laboratory investigations, which can be important diagnostic clues in attaining an appropriate diagnosis. Herein we present three cases of HGA, highlighting the spectrum of disease by which HGA can manifest. Although each case has their unique features, we outline important shared clinical elements to facilitate an empiric diagnosis while definitive laboratory investigations are pending. Our case series further serves to highlight the critical importance of prompt antimicrobial treatment to reduce morbidity and potential mortality.

KEYWORDS:

Anaplasma phagocytophilum; Canada; HGA; Human granulocytic anaplasmosis; Tick-borne illness; Zoonosis

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