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Brain Cogn. 2019 Feb;129:16-24. doi: 10.1016/j.bandc.2018.11.013. Epub 2018 Dec 3.

Ventral attention and motor network connectivity is relevant to functional impairment in spatial neglect after right brain stroke.

Author information

1
Kessler Foundation, 1199 Pleasant Valley Way, West Orange, NJ 07052, USA; Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ 07102, USA; Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation, 1199 Pleasant Valley Way, West Orange, NJ 07052, USA. Electronic address: abarrett@kesslerfoundation.org.
2
Kessler Foundation, 1199 Pleasant Valley Way, West Orange, NJ 07052, USA; Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ 07102, USA. Electronic address: oboukrina@kesslerfoundation.org.
3
Kessler Foundation, 1199 Pleasant Valley Way, West Orange, NJ 07052, USA; Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, NJ 07102, USA. Electronic address: ssaleh@kesslerfoundation.org.

Abstract

Emerging research suggests spatial neglect after right stroke is linked to dysfunctional attention and motor networks. Advanced functional connectivity analysis clarified brain network recovery, however we need to know how networks participate in adaptive motor performance. We need to verify network changes associated with validated functional measures and spatial-motor performance in spatial neglect, especially in patients with large brain lesions and significant disability. This study tested whether disability-relevant spatial neglect associates with different patterns of resting state functional connectivity between motor, dorsal and ventral attention networks (MN, DAN and VAN). Right stroke patients had spatial neglect (n = 8) or not (n = 10) on the Behavioural Inattention Test-conventional. Spatial neglect patients had weaker intranetwork VAN connectivity, and reduced internetwork connectivity between VAN and left frontal eye field (DAN), and between VAN and the left primary motor area (MN). These network impairments might explain the co-occurrence of attention and motor deficits in spatial neglect, and open a path to assessing functional connectivity in clinical trials of combined spatial retraining and motor rehabilitation after stroke.

KEYWORDS:

Attention network connectivity; Machine learning; Motor network connectivity; Spatial neglect; Stroke

PMID:
30522777
PMCID:
PMC6377801
DOI:
10.1016/j.bandc.2018.11.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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