Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Clin Anat. 2019 Apr;32(3):369-378. doi: 10.1002/ca.23321. Epub 2018 Dec 26.

Diffuse tibiofemoral cartilage change prior to the development of accelerated knee osteoarthritis: Data from the osteoarthritis initiative.

Author information

1
Division of Rheumatology, Allergy, and Immunology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts.
2
Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts.
3
Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy, Brigham & Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
4
The Institute for Clinical Research and Health Policy Studies, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts.
5
Tufts Clinical and Translational Science Institute, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts.
6
Center for Primary Care and Prevention, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Pawtucket, Rhode Island.
7
Medical Care Line and Research Care Line, Houston Health Services Research and Development (HSR&D) Center of Excellence Michael E. DeBakey VAMC, Houston, Texas.
8
Section of Immunology, Allergy, and Rheumatology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.
9
Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
10
Department of Radiology, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts.
11
Department of Computer Science and Networking, Wentworth Institute of Technology, Boston, Massachusetts.
12
Division of Epidemiology of Chronic Diseases and Vulnerable Populations, Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
13
Department of Radiology, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, United Kingdom.

Abstract

We compared the spatial distribution of tibiofemoral cartilage change between individuals who will develop accelerated knee osteoarthritis (KOA) versus typical onset of KOA prior to the development of radiographic KOA. We conducted a longitudinal case-control analysis of 129 individuals from the Osteoarthritis Initiative. We assessed the percent change in tibiofemoral cartilage on magnetic resonance images at 36 informative locations from 2 to 1 year prior to the development of accelerated (n = 44) versus typical KOA (n = 40). We defined cartilage change in the accelerated and typical KOA groups at 36 informative locations based on thresholds of cartilage percent change in a no KOA group (n = 45). We described the spatial patterns of cartilage change in the accelerated KOA and typical KOA groups and performed a logistic regression to determine if diffuse cartilage change (predictor; at least half of the tibiofemoral regions demonstrating change in multiple informative locations) was associated with KOA group (outcome). There was a non-significant trend that individuals with diffuse tibiofemoral cartilage change were 2.2 times more likely to develop accelerated knee OA when compared with individuals who develop typical knee OA (OR [95% CI] = 2.2 [0.90-5.14]. Adults with accelerated or typical KOA demonstrate heterogeneity in spatial distribution of cartilage thinning and thickening. These results provide preliminary evidence of a different spatial pattern of cartilage change between individuals who will develop accelerated versus typical KOA. These data suggest there may be different mechanisms driving the early structural disease progression between accelerated versus typical KOA. Clin. Anat. 32:369-378, 2019.

KEYWORDS:

articular cartilage; femur; tibia

PMID:
30521068
PMCID:
PMC6414263
DOI:
10.1002/ca.23321
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center