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Plant Mol Biol. 2019 Jan;99(1-2):1-15. doi: 10.1007/s11103-018-0797-7. Epub 2018 Dec 5.

Genome-wide association study of maize plant architecture using F1 populations.

Zhao Y1,2, Wang H1,2, Bo C1,2, Dai W1,2, Zhang X1,2, Cai R1,2, Gu L1,2, Ma Q1,2, Jiang H1,2, Zhu J3, Cheng B4,5.

Author information

1
National Engineering Laboratory of Crop Stress Resistance Breeding, School of Life Sciences, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei, China.
2
Key Laboratory of Crop Biology of Anhui Province, School of Life Sciences, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei, China.
3
Institute of Bioinformatics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China. jzhu@zju.edu.cn.
4
National Engineering Laboratory of Crop Stress Resistance Breeding, School of Life Sciences, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei, China. bjchengahau@163.com.
5
Key Laboratory of Crop Biology of Anhui Province, School of Life Sciences, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei, China. bjchengahau@163.com.

Abstract

Genome-wide association study of maize plant architecture using F1 populations can better dissect various genetic effects that can provide precise guidance for genetic improvement in maize breeding. Maize grain yield has increased at least eightfold during the past decades. Plant architecture, including plant height, leaf angle, leaf length, and leaf width, has been changed significantly to adapt to higher planting density. Although the genetic architecture of these traits has been dissected using different populations, the genetic basis remains unclear in the F1 population. In this work, we perform a genome-wide association study of the four traits using 573 F1 hybrids with a mixed linear model approach and QTXNetwork mapping software. A total of 36 highly significant associated quantitative trait SNPs were identified for these traits, which explained 51.86-79.92% of the phenotypic variation and were contributed mainly by additive, dominance, and environment-specific effects. Heritability as a result of environmental interaction was more important for leaf angle and leaf length, while major effects (a, aa, and d) were more important for leaf width and plant height. The potential breeding values of the superior lines and superior hybrids were also predicted, and these values can be applied in maize breeding by direct selection of superior genotypes for the associated quantitative trait SNPs. A total of 108 candidate genes were identified for the four traits, and further analysis was performed to screen the potential genes involved in the development of maize plant architecture. Our results provide new insights into the genetic architecture of the four traits, and will be helpful in marker-assisted breeding for maize plant architecture.

KEYWORDS:

F1 population; GWAS; Maize; Plant architecture; QTSs

PMID:
30519826
DOI:
10.1007/s11103-018-0797-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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