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Sci Rep. 2018 Dec 5;8(1):17678. doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-36098-5.

Conserved Transcriptional Signatures in Human and Murine Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy.

Author information

1
Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Grand Forks, North Dakota, 58202, USA.
2
Department of Neurology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109, USA.
3
Department of Neurology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109, USA. efeldman@med.umich.edu.
4
Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Grand Forks, North Dakota, 58202, USA. junguk.hur@med.und.edu.

Abstract

Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is one of the most common complications of diabetes. In this study, we employed a systems biology approach to identify DPN-related transcriptional pathways conserved across human and various murine models. Eight microarray datasets on peripheral nerve samples from murine models of type 1 (streptozotocin-treated) and type 2 (db/db and ob/ob) diabetes of various ages and human subjects with non-progressive and progressive DPN were collected. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified between non-diabetic and diabetic samples in murine models, and non-progressive and progressive human samples using a unified analysis pipeline. A transcriptional network for each DEG set was constructed based on literature-derived gene-gene interaction information. Seven pairwise human-vs-murine comparisons using a network-comparison program resulted in shared sub-networks including 46 to 396 genes, which were further merged into a single network of 688 genes. Pathway and centrality analyses revealed highly connected genes and pathways including LXR/RXR activation, adipogenesis, glucocorticoid receptor signalling, and multiple cytokine and chemokine pathways. Our systems biology approach identified highly conserved pathways across human and murine models that are likely to play a role in DPN pathogenesis and provide new possible mechanism-based targets for DPN therapy.

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