Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Qual Life Res. 2019 Apr;28(4):1105-1109. doi: 10.1007/s11136-018-2078-y. Epub 2018 Dec 5.

Causal attributions and their impact on psychosocial functioning in head and neck cancer patient-caregiver dyads: a preliminary, longitudinal study.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology and Markey Cancer Center, University of Kentucky, 307 Combs Cancer Research Building, Lexington, KY, 40536-0096, USA. burris.jessica@gmail.com.
2
Department of Psychology and Markey Cancer Center, University of Kentucky, 307 Combs Cancer Research Building, Lexington, KY, 40536-0096, USA.
3
Department of Public Health Sciences and Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA.
4
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA.
5
Department of Otolaryngology and Hollings Cancer Center, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This longitudinal study explores causal attributions in newly diagnosed head/neck cancer (HNC) patients and their caregivers.

METHODS:

Perceptions of causal attributions and associated level of responsibility regarding each patient's HNC diagnosis at baseline (n = 72 dyads) were described and then tested as predictors of depressive symptoms, cancer worry, and perceived support 6 months later.

RESULTS:

When causes were reported, tobacco and alcohol use topped the list of both patients and caregivers. Three-quarters of dyads agreed about perceptions of the patients' responsibility in causing their HNC. Some dyad-level patterns of causal attribution were associated with patients' and caregivers' cancer worry (p < 0.05) and caregivers' perceived support (p < 0.05) in unadjusted models.

CONCLUSIONS:

This preliminary study indicates that causal attributions warrant further exploration in HNC patient-caregiver dyads specifically, as well as studies of quality of life in patient-caregiver dyads more broadly considered.

KEYWORDS:

Cancer; Causal attributions; Distress; Dyads; Social support

PMID:
30515660
PMCID:
PMC6440835
[Available on 2020-04-01]
DOI:
10.1007/s11136-018-2078-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center