Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Curr Genet. 2018 Dec 4. doi: 10.1007/s00294-018-0913-x. [Epub ahead of print]

Escaping nuclear decay: the significance of mRNA export for gene expression.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University, C. F. Møllers Allé 3, Building, 1130, 8000, Aarhus C, Denmark. atudek@ibb.waw.pl.
2
Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Pawińskiego 5a, 02-106, Warsaw, Poland. atudek@ibb.waw.pl.
3
Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University, C. F. Møllers Allé 3, Building, 1130, 8000, Aarhus C, Denmark.
4
Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University, C. F. Møllers Allé 3, Building, 1130, 8000, Aarhus C, Denmark. thj@mbg.au.dk.

Abstract

In this perspective, we discuss the regulatory impact of nuclear RNA export and decay on messenger RNA (mRNA) functionality. It is well established that control of protein-coding gene expression in eukaryotes employs the regulated production of mRNA, its intra-cellular transfer to cytoplasmic ribosomes and final transcript degradation. Despite a rich body of literature on these events, an involvement of nuclear RNA decay systems remains largely unexplored. Instead, nuclear RNA degradation is often considered a quality control precaution engaged primarily in ridding cells of aberrantly processed transcripts and spurious non-coding RNA. Recent research from human and budding yeast cells, however, demonstrates that even protein-coding transcripts fall prey to nuclear decay and that this is countered by their nuclear export. Here, we outline the potential of nuclear polyA-binding proteins in tuning levels of cellular mRNA to maintain transcript homeostasis.

KEYWORDS:

Nab2; Nuclear RNA degradation; Nuclear RNA export; PABPN1; Transcription termination

PMID:
30515529
DOI:
10.1007/s00294-018-0913-x

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center