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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2018 Dec 18;115(51):13123-13128. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1816991115. Epub 2018 Dec 4.

Leucine-rich repeat extensin proteins regulate plant salt tolerance in Arabidopsis.

Author information

1
Shanghai Center for Plant Stress Biology and Center of Excellence in Molecular Plant Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 200032 Shanghai, China.
2
Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.
3
National Center for Soybean Improvement, Key Laboratory of Biology and Genetics and Breeding for Soybean, Ministry of Agriculture, State Key Laboratory of Crop Genetics and Germplasm Enhancement, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095, China.
4
Department of Biochemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.
5
Shanghai Center for Plant Stress Biology and Center of Excellence in Molecular Plant Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 200032 Shanghai, China; jkzhu@sibs.ac.cn.

Abstract

The perception and relay of cell-wall signals are critical for plants to regulate growth and stress responses, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We found that the cell-wall leucine-rich repeat extensins (LRX) 3/4/5 are critical for plant salt tolerance in Arabidopsis The LRXs physically associate with the RAPID ALKALINIZATION FACTOR (RALF) peptides RALF22/23, which in turn interact with the plasma membrane-localized receptor-like protein kinase FERONIA (FER). The lrx345 triple mutant as well as fer mutant plants display retarded growth and salt hypersensitivity, which are mimicked by overexpression of RALF22/23 Salt stress promotes S1P protease-dependent release of mature RALF22 peptides. Treatment of roots with mature RALF22/23 peptides or salt stress causes the internalization of FER. Our results suggest that the LRXs, RALFs, and FER function as a module to transduce cell-wall signals to regulate plant growth and salt stress tolerance.

KEYWORDS:

RLK; cell-wall stress; growth; receptor; stress tolerance

PMID:
30514814
PMCID:
PMC6305001
[Available on 2019-06-18]
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1816991115
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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