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Nutrients. 2018 Dec 1;10(12). pii: E1844. doi: 10.3390/nu10121844.

The Dietary Inflammatory Index and All-Cause, Cardiovascular Disease, and Cancer Mortality in the Multiethnic Cohort Study.

Author information

1
Cancer Center, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA. spark@cc.hawaii.edu.
2
Cancer Center, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA. mkang@cc.hawaii.edu.
3
Center for Gendered Innovations in Science and Technology Research (GISTeR), Seoul, Korea. mkang@cc.hawaii.edu.
4
Cancer Center, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA. lynne@cc.hawaii.edu.
5
Cancer Center, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA. yshvetso@cc.hawaii.edu.
6
School of Public Health, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152, USA. bharmon1@memphis.edu.
7
Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 292008, USA. shivappa@mailbox.sc.edu.
8
Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 292008, USA. wirthm@mailbox.sc.edu.
9
Cancer Prevention and Control Program, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 292008, USA. jhebert@mailbox.sc.edu.
10
Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA. christopher.haiman@med.usc.edu.
11
Cancer Center, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA. loic@cc.hawaii.edu.
12
Cancer Center, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA. cjboushey@cc.hawaii.edu.

Abstract

Diet quality based on inflammatory potential, assessed by the Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII®), has been related to mortality, but studies from racially/ethnically diverse populations are scarce. Using data from the Multiethnic Cohort Study in Hawaii and California, we investigated the association of the DII with all-cause, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer mortality, both overall and by race/ethnicity. The analysis included 150,405 African Americans, Native Hawaiians, Japanese Americans, Latinos, and Whites aged 45⁻75 years, with 47,436 deaths during an average follow-up of 18.2 ± 4.9 years. In multivariable-adjusted Cox models, the hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) for the highest vs. lowest quintile of the DII in men and women were 1.15 (1.09⁻1.21) and 1.22 (1.14⁻1.28) for all-cause, 1.13 (1.03⁻1.23) and 1.29 (1.17⁻1.42) for CVD, and 1.10 (1.00⁻1.21) and 1.13 (1.02⁻1.26) for cancer mortality. In men, an increased risk of all-cause mortality with higher DII scores was found in all racial/ethnic groups except for Native Hawaiians (P for heterogeneity < 0.001). Similarly, in women, an increased risk of CVD mortality was found in the four racial/ethnic groups, but not in Native Hawaiians. These findings support the association of a pro-inflammatory diet with a higher risk of mortality and suggest the association may vary by race/ethnicity.

KEYWORDS:

cancer; cardiovascular diseases; cohort; diet; dietary inflammatory index; mortality; multiethnic population

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