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Dev Biol. 2019 Feb 1;446(1):17-19. doi: 10.1016/j.ydbio.2018.11.018. Epub 2018 Dec 2.

A potential link between p53, cell competition and ribosomopathy in mammals and in Drosophila.

Author information

1
Department of Genetics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461, USA. Electronic address: Nicholas.baker@einstein.yu.edu.
2
Department of Genetics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461, USA.

Abstract

The term cell competition has been used to describe the phenomenon whereby particular cells can be eliminated during tissue growth only when more competitive cells are available to replace them. Multiple examples implicate differential activity of p53 in cell competition in mammals, but p53 has not been found to have the same role in Drosophila, where the phenomenon of cell competition was first recognized. Recent studies now show that Drosophila cells harboring mutations in Ribosomal protein (Rp) genes, which are eliminated by cell competition with wild type cells, activate a p53 target gene, Xrp1. In Diamond Blackfan Anemia, human Rp mutants activate p53 itself, through a nucleolar stress pathway. These results suggest a link between mammalian and Drosophila Rp mutants, translation, and cell competition.

KEYWORDS:

Cell competition; Diamond Blackfan Anemia; Minute; P53; Ribosomal protein

PMID:
30513308
PMCID:
PMC6642609
DOI:
10.1016/j.ydbio.2018.11.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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