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Dev Cell. 2018 Dec 3;47(5):608-628.e6. doi: 10.1016/j.devcel.2018.11.009.

From Pioneer to Repressor: Bimodal foxd3 Activity Dynamically Remodels Neural Crest Regulatory Landscape In Vivo.

Author information

1
Radcliffe Department of Medicine, MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DS, UK.
2
Molecular Haematology Unit, MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DS, UK.
3
MRC WIMM Centre for Computational Biology Research Group, MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DS, UK.
4
Radcliffe Department of Medicine, MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DS, UK. Electronic address: tatjana.sauka-spengler@imm.ox.ac.uk.

Abstract

The neural crest (NC) is a transient embryonic stem cell-like population characterized by its multipotency and broad developmental potential. Here, we perform NC-specific transcriptional and epigenomic profiling of foxd3-mutant cells in vivo to define the gene regulatory circuits controlling NC specification. Together with global binding analysis obtained by foxd3 biotin-ChIP and single cell profiles of foxd3-expressing premigratory NC, our analysis shows that, during early steps of NC formation, foxd3 acts globally as a pioneer factor to prime the onset of genes regulating NC specification and migration by re-arranging the chromatin landscape, opening cis-regulatory elements and reshuffling nucleosomes. Strikingly, foxd3 then gradually switches from an activator to its well-described role as a transcriptional repressor and potentially uses differential partners for each role. Taken together, these results demonstrate that foxd3 acts bimodally in the neural crest as a switch from "permissive" to "repressive" nucleosome and chromatin organization to maintain multipotency and define cell fates.

KEYWORDS:

chromatin dynamics; enhancer; foxd3; gene regulatory network; neural crest; pioneer factor; repressor; stem cells

PMID:
30513303
PMCID:
PMC6286384
DOI:
10.1016/j.devcel.2018.11.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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