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Cancer. 2019 Mar 15;125(6):943-951. doi: 10.1002/cncr.31895. Epub 2018 Dec 4.

Distribution of global health measures from routinely collected PROMIS surveys in patients with breast cancer or prostate cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Biomedical Informatics, Stanford University, California.
2
Department of Medicine (Oncology), Stanford University, California.
3
Department of Urology, Stanford University, California.
4
Department of Health Research and Policy, Stanford University, California.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The collection of patient-reported outcomes (PROs) is an emerging priority internationally, guiding clinical care, quality improvement projects and research studies. After the deployment of Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) surveys in routine outpatient workflows at an academic cancer center, electronic health record data were used to evaluate survey completion rates and self-reported global health measures across 2 tumor types: breast and prostate cancer.

METHODS:

This study retrospectively analyzed 11,657 PROMIS surveys from patients with breast cancer and 4411 surveys from patients with prostate cancer, and it calculated survey completion rates and global physical health (GPH) and global mental health (GMH) scores between 2013 and 2018.

RESULTS:

A total of 36.6% of eligible patients with breast cancer and 23.7% of patients with prostate cancer completed at least 1 survey, with completion rates lower among black patients for both tumor types (P < .05). The mean T scores (calibrated to a general population mean of 50) for GPH were 48.4 ± 9 for breast cancer and 50.6 ± 9 for prostate cancer, and the GMH scores were 52.7 ± 8 and 52.1 ± 9, respectively. GPH and GMH were frequently lower among ethnic minorities, patients without private health insurance, and those with advanced disease.

CONCLUSIONS:

This analysis provides important baseline data on patient-reported global health in breast and prostate cancer. Demonstrating that PROs can be integrated into clinical workflows, this study shows that supportive efforts may be needed to improve PRO collection and global health endpoints in vulnerable populations.

KEYWORDS:

breast; global health; patient-centered outcomes; prostate; real-world evidence

PMID:
30512191
PMCID:
PMC6403006
[Available on 2020-03-15]
DOI:
10.1002/cncr.31895

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