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Psychol Med. 2019 Oct;49(14):2452-2462. doi: 10.1017/S0033291718003458. Epub 2018 Dec 4.

Hippocampal subfields and visuospatial associative memory across stages of schizophrenia-spectrum disorder.

Wannan CMJ1,2,3,4,5, Cropley VL1,6, Chakravarty MM7,8, Van Rheenen TE1,6, Mancuso S9, Bousman C10,11,12, Everall I4,9,13,14,15, McGorry PD2, Pantelis C1,4,5,9,13,15, Bartholomeusz CF1,2,3.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Melbourne Neuropsychiatry Centre, The University of Melbourne and Melbourne Health, Carlton South, Victoria, Australia.
2
Orygen, The National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
3
The Centre for Youth Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
4
The Cooperative Research Centre for Mental Health, Melbourne, Australia.
5
North Western Mental Health, Melbourne Health, Parkville, VIC, Australia.
6
Centre for Mental Health, Faculty of Health, Arts and Design, School of Health Sciences, Swinburne University, Melbourne, Australia.
7
Cerebral Imaging Centre, Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montreal, Canada.
8
Departments of Psychiatry and Biological and Biomedical Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.
9
Department of Psychiatry, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
10
Departments of Medical Genetics, Psychiatry, and Physiology & Pharmacology, University of Calgary, AB, Canada.
11
Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada.
12
Alberta Children's Hospital Research Institute, Calgary, AB, Canada.
13
Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Centre for Neural Engineering, University of Melbourne, South Carlton, Victoria, Australia.
14
Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Neuroscience, King's College London, UK.
15
Florey Institute for Neuroscience & Mental Health, Parkville, VIC, Australia.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

While previous studies have identified relationships between hippocampal volumes and memory performance in schizophrenia, these relationships are not apparent in healthy individuals. Further, few studies have examined the role of hippocampal subfields in illness-related memory deficits, and no study has examined potential differences across varying illness stages. The current study aimed to investigate whether individuals with early and established psychosis exhibited differential relationships between visuospatial associative memory and hippocampal subfield volumes.

METHODS:

Measurements of visuospatial associative memory performance and grey matter volume were obtained from 52 individuals with a chronic schizophrenia-spectrum disorder, 28 youth with recent-onset psychosis, 52 older healthy controls, and 28 younger healthy controls.

RESULTS:

Both chronic and recent-onset patients had impaired visuospatial associative memory performance, however, only chronic patients showed hippocampal subfield volume loss. Both chronic and recent-onset patients demonstrated relationships between visuospatial associative memory performance and hippocampal subfield volumes in the CA4/dentate gyrus and the stratum that were not observed in older healthy controls. There were no group by volume interactions when chronic and recent-onset patients were compared.

CONCLUSIONS:

The current study extends the findings of previous studies by identifying particular hippocampal subfields, including the hippocampal stratum layers and the dentate gyrus, that appear to be related to visuospatial associative memory ability in individuals with both chronic and first-episode psychosis.

KEYWORDS:

CANTAB; dentate gyrus; first-episode psychosis; hippocampal subfields; hippocampus; memory; schizophrenia; visuospatial associative memory

PMID:
30511607
DOI:
10.1017/S0033291718003458

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