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J Adolesc Health. 2018 Nov 30. pii: S1054-139X(18)30437-3. doi: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2018.09.022. [Epub ahead of print]

Exploring Identities and Preferences for Intervention Among LGBTQ+ Young Adult Smokers Through Online Focus Groups.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Weill Institute for Neurosciences, University of California, San Francisco, California. Electronic address: Danielle.ramo@ucsf.edu.
2
Department of Psychiatry, Weill Institute for Neurosciences, University of California, San Francisco, California.
3
Department of Mental Health, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland.
4
Department of General Internal Medicine, Center for Vulnerable Populations, University of California, San Francisco, California.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

LGBTQ+ young adults are disproportionately affected by tobacco use and associated health conditions. A culturally tailored intervention may improve smoking cessation with this priority population. We conducted focus groups to inform development of a social media intervention to help LGBTQ+ young adults quit smoking.

METHODS:

We conducted two focus groups with LGBTQ+ young adults (N = 27) throughout the United States in a Facebook secret group online setting. An online survey characterized tobacco and other substance use. Questions posed to focus group participants addressed patterns and contexts of smoking, LGBTQ+ identity, and barriers and facilitators to participating in a culturally tailored smoking cessation intervention on social media. Focus group transcripts were coded and analyzed using directed content analysis.

RESULTS:

Overall, young adults had mixed feelings about linking the identities of LGBTQ+ and smoking, and reflected differences in online and "real life" identities. Participants were generally receptive to a social media smoking cessation intervention with concerns about privacy in sharing their smoking status and LGBTQ+ identities with their online social networks. Gender nonconforming individuals had some unique concerns about Facebook policies.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study highlights important considerations in tailoring a social media intervention for LGBTQ+ young adults. We identified experiences of LGBTQ+ young adults that would support tailoring to a diverse community, and suggestions for how to make smoking cessation programs more appealing to this priority population.

KEYWORDS:

Cessation; Focus groups; Gender minority; Intervention; LGBTQ+; Prevention; Sexual minority; Social media; Tobacco; Youth and young adults

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