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Am J Surg. 2018 Nov 27. pii: S0002-9610(18)30698-6. doi: 10.1016/j.amjsurg.2018.11.036. [Epub ahead of print]

Scientific publication misrepresentation among orthopaedic residency applicants.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA. Electronic address: marcbeaino@gmail.com.
2
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA.
3
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA; United States Navy, Washington, DC, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The predictors of erroneous publication reporting among orthopaedic surgery residency applicants have not been established.

METHODS:

A retrospective analysis of the reported scholarly activity of candidates who applied to our orthopaedic surgery department for a first-year residency position in 2017 was conducted to determine the incidence of scientific publication misrepresentation and analyze its association with pre-residency criteria.

RESULTS:

Out of 510 candidates, 264 (51.8%) applicants included accepted, in-press, or published scholarly activity on their resumes. The incidence of misrepresentation was 20.5%, and did not differ statistically based on the candidates' academic performance (United States Medical Licensing Examination - USMLE - steps 1 and 2 scores), Alpha Omega Alpha (AOA) membership, immigration status, or or additional academic degrees (p > 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Misrepresentation is a persistent problem among residency training program applicants, and did not correlate with an applicant's academic performance, AOA membership, immigration status, or additional advanced academic degrees.

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