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Surg Neurol Int. 2018 Oct 30;9:218. doi: 10.4103/sni.sni_480_17. eCollection 2018.

The concept of rapid rescue radiosurgery in the acute management of critically located brain metastases: A retrospective short-term outcome analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Neurosurgery, Karolinska Institute, Centre for Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
2
Department of Medical Radiation Physics and Nuclear Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Centre for Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
3
Division of Therapeutic Immunology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Centre for Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

Background:

Adaptive hypofractionated gamma knife radiosurgery has been used to treat brain metastases in the eloquent regions while limiting the risk of adverse radiation effect (ARE). Ablative responses might be achieved within days to weeks with the goal to preserve the neurological function. The application of this treatment modality in selected acute/subacute settings has been termed Rapid Rescue Radiosurgery (RRR) in our department. We report the expeditious effects of RRR during treatment and 4 weeks after treatment completion.

Methods:

In all, 34 patients with 40 brain metastases, each treated over a period of 7 days in three separate gamma knife radiosurgery sessions (GKRS 1-3) between November 2013 and August 2017, were retrospectively analyzed in terms of tumor volume reduction, salvage of organs at risk (OAR), and radiation induced toxicity under the period of treatment (GKRS 1-3 = one week) and at first follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (4 weeks after GKRS 3).

Results:

Mean tumor volume at GKRS 1 was 12.8 cm3. Mean peripheral doses at GKRS 1, GKRS 2, and GKRS 3 were 7.7 Gy, 8.1 Gy, and 8.4 Gy (range: 6.0-9.5 Gy) at the 35% to 50% isodose lines. In the surviving group at first follow-up (n = 28), mean tumor volume reduction was - 10% at GKRS 3 (1 week) and - 48% four weeks after GKRS 3. There was no further clinical deterioration between GKRS 3 and first follow-up in 21 patients. Six patients died prior to first follow-up due to extracranial disease. No ARE was noticed/reported.

Conclusions:

In this study, RRR proved effective in terms of rapid tumor volume reduction, debulking, and preservation/rescue of neurological function.

KEYWORDS:

Adaptive hypofractionation; adverse radiation event; brain metastases; gamma knife radiosurgery; recursive partitioning analysis

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