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Mar Pollut Bull. 2018 Dec;137:12-23. doi: 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2018.09.054. Epub 2018 Oct 4.

Ingestion of plastic by fish: A comparison of Thames Estuary and Firth of Clyde populations.

Author information

1
School of Biological Sciences, Royal Holloway University of London, Egham, Surrey TW20 0EX, UK; Department of Life Sciences, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, UK. Electronic address: alexandra.mcgoran.2012@live.rhul.ac.uk.
2
School of Health and Life Sciences, University of the West of Scotland, Paisley, PA1 2BE, UK.
3
Department of Life Sciences, The Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, UK.
4
School of Biological Sciences, Royal Holloway University of London, Egham, Surrey TW20 0EX, UK.

Abstract

This study compared plastic ingestion between pelagic and benthic fish populations from two UK watersheds: the Thames Estuary and the Firth of Clyde. The alimentary canals of 876 individuals were examined. Of twenty-one estuarine species investigated, fourteen ingested plastics, including predator (fish) and prey (shrimp) species. Overall, 32% of organisms ingested plastic, mostly fibres (88% of total plastics). More flatfish (38%) ingested plastics than other benthic species (17%). In the Thames, more plastic was ingested by pelagic species (average number of plastic pieces ingested: 3.2) and flatfish (average number of plastic pieces ingested: 2.9) than by shrimp (average number of plastic pieces ingested: 1). More fish from the Clyde ingested plastic than similar Thames species (39% compared to 28% respectively); however, the average amount of plastic ingested did not differ between the sites.

KEYWORDS:

FTIR spectroscopy; Firth of Clyde fish populations; Microfibres; Microplastics; Thames Estuary

PMID:
30503418
DOI:
10.1016/j.marpolbul.2018.09.054
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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