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Am J Perinatol. 2018 Nov 30. doi: 10.1055/s-0038-1675770. [Epub ahead of print]

Multivariable Analysis of the Association between Antenatal Depressive Symptomatology and Postpartum Visit Attendance.

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1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

 We sought to evaluate whether antenatal depression was associated with postpartum visit nonattendance.

STUDY DESIGN:

 This retrospective cohort study included women who received prenatal care at the academic outpatient offices of a single tertiary care center between March 1, 2009, and December 31, 2014. Women were screened for antenatal depression using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Attendance at the postpartum visit was compared between women with and without antenatal depressive symptomatology using bivariate and multivariable analyses.

RESULTS:

 Of the 2,870 women who met the inclusion criteria, 566 (19.7%) did not attend the postpartum visit. Women who did not attend a postpartum visit were younger and more likely to be a racial/ethnic minority, publicly insured, or multiparous; they were more likely to have a higher body mass index, as well as a vaginal delivery. Compared with those without antenatal depressive symptomatology, women with antenatal depressive symptomatology were significantly less likely to attend their postpartum visit (18.6 vs. 29.2%, p < 0.001). This association persisted even after controlling for potential confounders (adjusted odds ratio: 0.69, 95% confidence interval: 0.48-0.99).

CONCLUSION:

 Antenatal depressive symptomatology is significantly associated with nonattendance at the postpartum visit.

PMID:
30500966
DOI:
10.1055/s-0038-1675770

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