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J Nurs Adm. 2019 Jan;49(1):19-23. doi: 10.1097/NNA.0000000000000702.

Assessing Compassion Fatigue Risk Among Nurses in a Large Urban Trauma Center.

Author information

1
Author Affiliations: Doctoral Candidate (Dr Wijdenes), University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona; Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner (Dr Wijdenes), Currently United States Air Force, Biloxi, Mississippi; Professor and Director Community and Systems Health Science Division (Dr Badger); Clinical Associate Professor (Dr Sheppard), College of Nursing, University of Arizona, Tucson.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study evaluated the prevalence and severity of compassion fatigue (CF) risk among nurses employed in a large southwestern hospital system.

BACKGROUND:

Compassion fatigue is defined as multifaceted exhaustion stemming from untreated distress that leads to physical and emotional problems. Low morale, increased medication errors, and higher turnover can result.

METHODS:

A descriptive design was used to identify: 1) the prevalence and severity of CF risk among a sample of registered nurses; and 2) the differences in demographic characteristics correlated with CF risk.

RESULTS:

Forty-six percent of nurses reported moderate to high CF risk. Compassion fatigue risk was significantly associated with years of employment, unit worked, job changes, and use of sick days.

CONCLUSION:

This study reports new knowledge about compassion fatigue, established risk profiles across clinical units, and clarified optimal timing for interventions for those at the highest risk for CF.

PMID:
30499866
DOI:
10.1097/NNA.0000000000000702
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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