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J Clin Periodontol. 2018 Nov 30. doi: 10.1111/jcpe.13039. [Epub ahead of print]

Is there an association between depression and periodontitis? A birth cohort study.

Author information

1
Section of Periodontology, Department of Dentistry and Oral Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
2
Graduate Program in Dentistry, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil.
3
Postgraduate Program in Health and Behavior, Catholic University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil.
4
School of Dentistry and Oral Health, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.
5
Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.
6
Graduate Program in Epidemiology, Federal University of Pelotas, Pelotas, Brazil.

Abstract

AIM:

To investigate the association between depression and periodontitis among adults enrolled in the 1982 Pelotas Birth Cohort, Brazil.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Major depressive episode and severity of depressive symptoms obtained in 2012 were considered the exposure of this study. In 2013, periodontitis, the outcome of interest, was clinically assessed and two different case definitions were used: the CDC/AAP and a combination of CAL and BOP simultaneously. Serum levels of C-reactive protein and frequency of dental flossing were defined as mediators while confounders comprised a set of variables collected throughout the life-course of the participants. The parametric g-formula was used to test the direct, indirect and total effects of depression on periodontitis.

RESULTS:

539 participants were clinically examined. Individuals with depressive symptoms presented higher risk of periodontitis (RR 1.19). The presence of depressive symptoms was also associated with moderate/severe periodontitis (total effect RR 1.18). None of the associations was mediated by flossing or C-reactive protein levels. Finally, neither the presence of depressive symptoms nor the presence of major depression was associated with the combination of CAL+BOP.

CONCLUSIONS:

A positive association between depressive symptoms and periodontitis and moderate/severe periodontitis was found. Major depressive episode was not associated with periodontitis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

cohort studies; depressive symptoms; major depression; periodontal diseases

PMID:
30499588
DOI:
10.1111/jcpe.13039

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