Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nicotine Tob Res. 2019 Apr 17;21(5):576-583. doi: 10.1093/ntr/nty241.

The 2016 Tips From Former Smokers® Campaign: Associations With Quit Intentions and Quit Attempts Among Smokers With and Without Mental Health Conditions.

Author information

1
Stanford Prevention Research Center, Stanford University, Stanford, CA.
2
Department of Measurement, Evaluation, Statistics, & Assessment, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA.
3
Center for Health Policy Science and Tobacco Research, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC.
4
McKing Consulting, Fairfax, VA.
5
Tobacco Control Research Branch, Behavioral Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD.
6
Office on Smoking and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

People living with mental health conditions (MH+) are more likely to smoke cigarettes than people without mental health conditions (MH-) and to experience tobacco-related disparities. The Tips From Former Smokers® (Tips®) campaign is a proven population-level strategy for motivating smokers to quit. In 2016, Tips included ads featuring Rebecca, a former smoker with depression. We evaluated self-reported frequency of exposure to the Rebecca and other Tips ads in association with quit intentions and quit attempts among MH+ and MH- smokers.

METHODS:

Intentions to quit and past 6-month quit attempts lasting at least 24 hours were reported from a two-wave longitudinal online survey conducted before and after the 2016 Tips campaign with a nationally representative sample of US adult cigarette smokers with (MH+, N = 777) and without (MH-, N = 1806) lifetime mental health conditions.

RESULTS:

In 2016, among MH+ respondents, greater exposure to the Rebecca ads was significantly associated with increased odds of intending to quit in the next 30 days (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.40, p < .05) and with reporting a quit attempt in the past 6 months (AOR = 1.25, p < .05). Among MH- respondents, greater exposure to the other Tips ads was associated with increased odds of making a quit attempt (AOR = 1.19, p < .05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Exposure to the Rebecca ads was associated with a greater likelihood of intentions to quit and quit attempts among MH+ smokers; whereas, exposure to the other (non-mental-health-related) Tips ads was associated with a greater likelihood of quit attempts among MH- smokers.

IMPLICATIONS:

National media campaigns are an important population-level strategy for reaching specific population groups who are experiencing tobacco-related disparities. The findings support the inclusion of ads featuring people living with mental health conditions in national tobacco education media campaigns, such as Tips.

PMID:
30496491
PMCID:
PMC6615317
[Available on 2019-11-28]
DOI:
10.1093/ntr/nty241

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center