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Support Care Cancer. 2018 Nov 28. doi: 10.1007/s00520-018-4564-8. [Epub ahead of print]

Amisulpride prevents nausea and vomiting associated with highly emetogenic chemotherapy: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose-ranging trial.

Author information

1
Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark. jherr@regionsjaelland.dk.
2
Department of Clinical Oncology, Zealand University Hospital, Sygehusvej 10, 4000, Roskilde, Denmark. jherr@regionsjaelland.dk.
3
Pulmonary Oncology Unit, University Hospital of South Manchester, Manchester, UK.
4
Department of Oncology/Haematology, Halle (Saale) University Clinic, Halle (Saale), Germany.
5
Department of Medicine V, Hematology, Oncology and Rheumatology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany.
6
Pulmonology Clinic, Asklepios Specialist Clinic, Gauting, Munich, Germany.
7
Department of Oncology, Herlev University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
8
Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.
9
Academic Unit of Oncology, Nottingham University Hospitals, Nottingham, UK.
10
Department of Medical Oncology, Mid Yorkshire NHS Trust, Wakefield, UK.
11
Haematology, Oncology and Palliative Medicine Department, Neuperlach Clinic, Munich, Germany.
12
Department of Oncology, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth, UK.
13
Cancer Clinical Trials Office, Wexham Park Hospital, Slough, UK.
14
Department of Clinical Development, Acacia Pharma Ltd, Cambridge, UK.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) remain significant clinical problems, especially in the delayed phase (24-120 h after chemotherapy). Amisulpride is a dopamine D2/D3-receptor antagonist previously shown to be an effective intravenous antiemetic. We conducted a randomised, double-blind study to characterise the dose response of oral amisulpride in delayed phase CINV.

METHODS:

Chemotherapy-naïve patients receiving cisplatin ≥ 70 mg/m2 or an anthracycline-cyclophosphamide regimen for breast cancer received, on day 1, 20 mg amisulpride and 8-16 mg ondansetron intravenously followed, once daily on days 2-4, by 10, 20 or 40 mg oral amisulpride or placebo. A control group receiving standard three-drug prophylaxis was enrolled for assay sensitivity purposes. The primary endpoint was complete response (CR), defined as no emesis or rescue medication use, in the delayed phase.

RESULTS:

Three hundred eighteen subjects were evaluable per protocol. CR rate (24-120 h) was 20% with placebo and 46% with 10 mg amisulpride (p = 0.006 after multiplicity adjustment); in the three-drug control group, it was 59%. Emesis, nausea and 0-120-h CR rate were significantly improved with 10 mg amisulpride compared to placebo. Higher doses of amisulpride were not more effective than 10 mg. In patients with acute phase CR, delayed phase CR rate was 44% for placebo, 75% for 10 mg amisulpride (p = 0.022) and 70% for the 3-drug control. No significant differences were seen between groups in safety parameters.

CONCLUSIONS:

Amisulpride 10 mg orally is safe and superior to placebo at preventing delayed CINV caused by highly emetogenic chemotherapy.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

NCT01857232.

KEYWORDS:

Amisulpride; Anthracycline-cyclophosphamide; Chemotherapy; Cisplatin; Nausea; Vomiting

PMID:
30488222
DOI:
10.1007/s00520-018-4564-8

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