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JAMA. 2018 Nov 27;320(20):2122-2128. doi: 10.1001/jama.2018.17772.

Interventions to Prevent Child Maltreatment: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement.

Author information

1
University of Iowa, Iowa City.
2
Fairfax Family Practice Residency, Fairfax, Virginia.
3
Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond.
4
Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California.
5
Stanford University, Stanford, California.
6
Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
7
Oregon Health & Science University, Portland.
8
Columbia University, New York, New York.
9
University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.
10
Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine, Roanoke.
11
Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, Seattle.
12
Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio.
13
Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
14
University of Alabama at Birmingham.
15
University of California, Los Angeles.
16
Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts.
17
Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois.
18
University of Hawaii, Honolulu.
19
Pacific Health Research and Education Institute, Honolulu, Hawaii.
20
Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts.

Abstract

Importance:

In 2016, approximately 676 000 children in the United States experienced maltreatment (abuse, neglect, or both), with 75% of these children experiencing neglect, 18% experiencing physical abuse, and 8% experiencing sexual abuse. Approximately 14% of abused children experienced multiple forms of maltreatment, and more than 1700 children died as a result of maltreatment.

Objective:

To update the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) 2013 recommendation on primary care interventions to prevent child maltreatment.

Evidence Review:

The USPSTF commissioned a review of the evidence on primary care interventions to prevent maltreatment in children and adolescents without signs or symptoms of maltreatment.

Findings:

The USPSTF found limited and inconsistent evidence on the benefits of primary care interventions, including home visitation programs, to prevent child maltreatment and found no evidence related to the harms of such interventions. The USPSTF concludes that the evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of primary care interventions to prevent child maltreatment. The level of certainty of the magnitude of the benefits and harms of these interventions is low.

Conclusions and Recommendation:

The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of primary care interventions to prevent child maltreatment. (I statement).

Summary for patients in

PMID:
30480735
DOI:
10.1001/jama.2018.17772
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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