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Int J Eat Disord. 2018 Dec;51(12):1357-1360. doi: 10.1002/eat.22972. Epub 2018 Nov 27.

Identifying a male clinical cutoff on the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire (EDE-Q).

Author information

1
Sanford Research, Fargo, North Dakota.
2
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Fargo, North Dakota.
3
Rogers Memorial Hospital, Oconomowoc, Wisconsin.
4
Department of Psychology, Chapman University, California.
5
Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin.
6
Department of Psychology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan.
7
Department of Psychology, University at Albany-State University of New York, New York.
8
Department of Psychology, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Evidence suggests that eating disorders (EDs) may be under-detected in males. Commonly used measures of EDs such as the Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire (EDE-Q) were initially developed within female samples, raising concern regarding the extent to which these instruments may be appropriate for detecting EDs in males. The current study used receiver operating characteristic curve analysis to (a) examine the accuracy of the EDE-Q global score in correctly classifying males with and without clinically significant ED pathology, and (b) establish the optimal EDE-Q global clinical cutoff for males.

METHOD:

Participants were a clinical sample of 245 male ED patients and a control sample of 205 male undergraduates.

RESULTS:

Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire global scores demonstrated moderate-high accuracy in predicting ED status (area under the curve = 0.85, 95% CI: 0.82-0.89). The optimal cutoff of 1.68 yielded a sensitivity of 0.77 and specificity of 0.77.

DISCUSSION:

Overall, results provide preliminary support for the discriminant validity of EDE-Q scores among males. However, concerns remain regarding the measure's ability to comprehensively assess domains of disordered eating most relevant to males. Therefore, careful attention to the possibility for measurement bias and continued evaluation of the scale in males is encouraged.

KEYWORDS:

ROC curve analysis; assessment; discriminant validity; eating pathology; measurement; men

PMID:
30480321
PMCID:
PMC6310481
[Available on 2019-12-01]
DOI:
10.1002/eat.22972
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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