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Physiotherapy. 2018 Dec;104(4):400-407. doi: 10.1016/j.physio.2017.01.007. Epub 2017 Mar 24.

Predictors for global perceived effect after physiotherapy in patients with neck pain: an observational study.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. Electronic address: ingebrigt.meisingset@ntnu.no.
2
Department of Public Health and General Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the prognostic importance of a number of sensorimotor and psychological factors for global perceived effect (GPE) after physiotherapy in patients with neck pain. In addition to baseline values, change scores were used as independent variables to identify treatment-modifiable factors.

DESIGN:

Clinical cohort study.

SETTING:

Primary and secondary healthcare physiotherapy clinics.

PARTICIPANTS:

Patients (n=70) with non-specific neck pain.

INTERVENTION:

Usual care physiotherapy.

METHODS:

A three-dimensional motion tracking system was used to measure neck motion and sensorimotor variables, in addition to self-reported outcomes covering personal, somatic and psychological factors at baseline (before treatment) and at 2 months. Logistic regression was used to analyse associations between the prognostic variables and the primary outcome (GPE) at 2 months.

RESULTS:

At baseline, neck motion and motor control, pain duration and functioning were the strongest predictors for GPE, with no effect of psychological factors. Among the change variables, reduced pain intensity [odds ratio (OR) 1.86; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.31 to 2.62], increased functioning (OR 1.46; 95% CI 1.11 to 1.92), reduced disability (OR 1.12; 95% CI 1.05 to 1.20), reduced kinesiophobia (OR 1.21; 95% CI 1.07 to 1.37), reduced catastrophising (OR 1.09; 95% CI 1.09 to 1.18) and increased self-efficacy (OR 1.12; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.21) were significantly associated with GPE.

CONCLUSIONS:

Both baseline values and change in pain intensity and functioning predicted GPE at 2 months. Psychological factors such as kinesiophobia, catastrophising and self-efficacy were only able to predict outcome by their change scores, indicating that these factors are modifiable by common physiotherapy practice and are important for GPE.

KEYWORDS:

Motion; Motor control; Neck pain; Physiotherapy; Prognosis; Psychological

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