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Sleep. 2019 Feb 1;42(2). doi: 10.1093/sleep/zsy228.

Impaired social functioning in children with narcolepsy.

Author information

1
Center for Sleep Medicine, Kempenhaeghe, Heeze, The Netherlands.
2
Department of Industrial Design, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
3
Department of Electrical Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands.
4
Sleep-Wake Centre, SEIN, Heemstede, The Netherlands.
5
Department of Psychiatry, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Pediatric Sleep Center, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium.
6
Department of Child Neurology, Juliana Children's Hospital-Haga Teaching Hospital, The Hague, The Netherlands.
7
Sleeping Center, Medical Centre Haaglanden, The Hague, The Netherlands.

Abstract

Study Objectives:

To explore impairments in social functioning in children with narcolepsy compared to healthy children.

Methods:

Parents of 53 pediatric patients with narcolepsy type 1 and 64 matched healthy children completed the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) and the Child Behavior Checklist 6-18 (CBCL 6-18).

Results:

Patients scored significantly higher on the total score of the SRS (median 56, interquartile range [IQR] 23.5) compared to controls (median 44.5, IQR 8.5, U = 797.0, p < 0.001). Patients also scored higher on the sum of the CBCL 6-18 subscales indicative of social functioning (Withdrawn/Depressed, Social Problems, and Thought Problems; median 183, IQR 30.5) compared to controls (median 155, IQR 13, U = 500.0, p < 0.001). A total of 24 patients (45.3%) reported at least mild-to-moderate difficulties in social functioning compared to seven controls (10.9%, χ2 = 17.165, p < 0.001). Eleven patients (20.8%) and only one control (1.6%) had T scores above 75, which points to severely impaired social functioning (χ2 = 11.602, p = 0.001). Within the patient group, girls reported mild-to-moderate difficulties in social functioning significantly more often compared to boys on the SRS (77.8% versus 28.6%, χ2 = 17.560, p < 0.001).

Conclusions:

Impaired social functioning is common in children with narcolepsy type 1, especially in girls. Questionnaires such as the SRS and the CBCL 6-18 may help in early detection of social problems in pediatric narcolepsy. Recognition of these problems could be valuable in the management of young people with narcolepsy.

PMID:
30476304
DOI:
10.1093/sleep/zsy228

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