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Sci Total Environ. 2019 Mar 10;655:408-413. doi: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.11.233. Epub 2018 Nov 17.

Pharmaceutical residues in streams near concentrated animal feeding operations of Korea - Occurrences and associated ecological risks.

Author information

1
Department of Environmental Health, Graduate School at Yongin University, Yongin 17092, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Environmental Health, Graduate School at Yongin University, Yongin 17092, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: kyungheeji@yongin.ac.kr.
3
School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Republic of Korea.
4
Department of Environmental Health, Graduate School at Yongin University, Yongin 17092, Republic of Korea; School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Republic of Korea.
5
Department of Health, Environment and Safety, Eulji University, Seongnam 13135, Republic of Korea.
6
National Institute of Environmental Research, Incheon 22689, Republic of Korea.
7
School of Public Health, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: kyungho@snu.ac.kr.

Abstract

Concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) have been suggested to be the most significant source of pharmaceutical release into the environment. However, limited information is available on the occurrence of veterinary pharmaceutical residues and the associated ecological risks to the aquatic environment near CAFO areas. In this study, ten commonly used veterinary antibiotics, including sulfonamides, tetracyclines, and cephalosporins, along with three analgesics, were measured in water samples collected from the streams that run near two CAFOs in Korea in 2013 (n = 16) and 2014 (n = 10). In addition, the associated ecological risks were estimated by calculating risk quotient. The pharmaceuticals were detected in a higher amount in the samples collected downstream from the CAFO than in those collected upstream. Acetaminophen, sulfamethazine, sulfathiazole, and oxytetracycline were detected at maximum concentrations of 38.8 μg/L, 21.3 μg/L, 17.4 μg/L, and 16.9 μg/L, respectively. Relatively higher concentrations of pharmaceuticals were observed in locations adjacent to the CAFO and the downstream area, suggesting the influence of the CAFO. Except for acetaminophen, lower concentrations of the target pharmaceuticals were detected in the samples collected during the high-flow season. The concentrations of most of the target pharmaceuticals exceeded the risk quotient of one, suggesting potential ecological effects in the areas affected by CAFOs. Our observations show that the water environment near a CAFO could be heavily affected by veterinary pharmaceuticals and analgesic drugs that are also frequently used among humans. Hence, the ecological consequences of pharmaceutical residues in the water bodies near CAFOs warrant further investigation.

KEYWORDS:

Concentrated animal feeding operations; Livestock farming; Pharmaceuticals; Risk assessment; Veterinary antibiotics

PMID:
30472642
DOI:
10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.11.233
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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