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Drug Alcohol Depend. 2019 Jan 1;194:363-370. doi: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2018.10.004. Epub 2018 Nov 7.

E-cigarette use and respiratory disorder in an adult sample.

Author information

1
Cancer Prevention Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, 701 Ilalo Street, Honolulu, HI, 96813, USA. Electronic address: twills@cc.hawaii.edu.
2
Cancer Prevention Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, 701 Ilalo Street, Honolulu, HI, 96813, USA.
3
Office of Public Health Studies, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 1960 East-West Road, Honolulu, HI, 96822, USA.
4
Department of Medicine, John A. Burns School of Medicine, 1356 Lusitana Street, 7th floor, Honolulu, HI 96813, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

Little evidence is available on the association of e-cigarettes with health indices. We investigated the association of e-cigarette use with diagnosed respiratory disorder among adults in data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey (BRFSS).

METHODS:

The 2016 Hawaii BRFSS, a cross-sectional random-dial telephone survey, had 8087 participants; mean age was 55 years. Items asked about e-cigarette use, cigarette smoking, and being diagnosed by a health professional with (a) asthma or (b) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Multivariable analyses tested associations of e-cigarette use with the respiratory variables controlling for smoking and for demographic, physical, and psychosocial variables.

RESULTS:

Controlling for the covariates and smoking there was a significant association of e-cigarette use with chronic pulmonary disorder in the total sample (AOR = 2.58, CI 1.36-4.89, p < 0.01) and a significant association with asthma among nonsmokers (AOR = 1.33, CI 1.00-1.77, p <  0.05). The associations were stronger among nonsmokers than among smokers. Results were similar for analyses based on relative risk and absolute risk. There was also a greater likelihood of respiratory disorder for smokers, females, and persons with overweight, financial stress, and secondhand smoke exposure.

CONCLUSIONS:

This is the first study to show a significant independent association of e-cigarette use with chronic respiratory disorder. Several aspects of the data are inconsistent with the possibility that e-cigarettes were being used for smoking cessation by persons with existing respiratory disorder. Theoretical mechanisms that might link e-cigarettes use and respiratory symptoms are discussed.

KEYWORDS:

Adults; Asthma; COPD; E-cigarettes; Smoking

PMID:
30472577
PMCID:
PMC6312492
[Available on 2020-01-01]
DOI:
10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2018.10.004

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