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J Neurol Sci. 2019 Jan 15;396:159-164. doi: 10.1016/j.jns.2018.11.015. Epub 2018 Nov 10.

Supplementary motor area connectivity and dual-task walking variability in multiple sclerosis.

Author information

1
Program in Physical Therapy and Department of Neurology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, United States; Division of Physical Therapy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, United States; School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, United States. Electronic address: nora.fritz@wayne.edu.
2
Division of Physical Therapy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, United States; School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, United States.
3
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, United States.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Despite the prevalence of dual-task (e.g., walking while talking) deficits in people with multiple sclerosis (MS), no neuroimaging studies to date have examined neuronal networks used for dual-task processing or specific brain areas related to dual-task performance in this population. A better understanding of the relationship among underlying brain areas and dual-task performance may improve targeted rehabilitation programs. The objective of this study was to examine relationships between neuroimaging measures and clinical measures of dual-task performance, and reported falls in persons with MS.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

All participants completed measures of dual-task performance, a fall history, and neuroimaging on a 3 T MRI scanner. Spearman correlations were used to examine relationships among dual-task performance, falls and neuroimaging measures.

RESULTS:

Eighteen females with relapsing-remitting MS [mean age = 45.5 ± 8.2 SD; mean symptom duration = 12.3 ± 6.7 years; Expanded Disability Status Scale median 2.25 (range 1.5-4)] participated in this study. Structural imaging measures of supplementary motor area (SMA) interhemispheric connectivity were significantly related to dual-task walking variability.

CONCLUSIONS:

The SMA interhemispheric tract may play a role in dual-task performance. Structural neuroimaging may be a useful adjunct to clinical measures to predict performance and provide information about recovery patterns in MS. Functional recovery can be challenging to objectively report in MS; diffusion tensor imaging could show microstructural improvements and suggest improved connectivity.

KEYWORDS:

Dual-task; Multiple sclerosis; Neuroimaging; Supplementary motor area; Walking

PMID:
30472552
PMCID:
PMC6324982
[Available on 2020-01-15]
DOI:
10.1016/j.jns.2018.11.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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