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Psychiatry Res. 2019 Jan;271:121-123. doi: 10.1016/j.psychres.2018.11.040. Epub 2018 Nov 19.

Complex PTSD and intergenerational transmission of distress and resilience among Tutsi genocide survivors and their offspring: A preliminary report.

Author information

1
The Interdisciplinary Department of Social Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Israel. Electronic address: amit.shrira@biu.ac.il.
2
The Interdisciplinary Department of Social Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Israel.
3
Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

The research on survivors of genocide has focused on PTSD, but complex PTSD (CPTSD) and its potential effect on intergenerational transmission are understudied. This study assessed complex PTSD and resilience among Tutsi genocide survivors (n = 60, mean age = 52.27 [SD = 6.27]) and their offspring (n = 60, mean age = 21.21 [SD = 1.78]). Offspring of parents suffering from PTSD or CPTSD reported more secondary traumatization symptoms relative to offspring of parents without PTSD (p < 0.0001). Moreover, parental CPTSD was related to lower resilience among both survivors and offspring (p < 0.0001). The current findings suggest that parental CPTSD may have broader influences manifested in offspring lower resilience.

KEYWORDS:

Complex PTSD; Intergenerational transmission of trauma; Resilience

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