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Braz J Phys Ther. 2018 Nov 16. pii: S1413-3555(18)30240-5. doi: 10.1016/j.bjpt.2018.11.001. [Epub ahead of print]

What are the clinical implications of knee crepitus to individuals with knee osteoarthritis? An observational study with data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

Author information

1
Physical Therapy Department, School of Science and Technology, Universidade Estadual Paulista "Julio de Mesquita Filho" (UNESP), Presidente Prudente, SP, Brazil; La Trobe Sports and Exercise Medicine Research Centre (LASEM), School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria, Australia.
2
Physical Therapy Department, School of Science and Technology, Universidade Estadual Paulista "Julio de Mesquita Filho" (UNESP), Presidente Prudente, SP, Brazil.
3
The University of Sydney, Discipline of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
4
Physical Therapy Department, School of Science and Technology, Universidade Estadual Paulista "Julio de Mesquita Filho" (UNESP), Presidente Prudente, SP, Brazil. Electronic address: micolis@fct.unesp.br.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Crepitus is a common clinical feature of knee osteoarthritis. However, the importance of crepitus in the overall clinical presentation of individuals with knee osteoarthritis is unknown.

OBJECTIVE(S):

(A) To compare function, pain and quality of life between individuals with knee osteoarthritis with and without crepitus; (B) to compare whether individuals with knee osteoarthritis in both knees, but crepitus in just one, differ in terms of function pain, and knee strength.

METHODS:

Setting: Observational study.

PARTICIPANTS:

(A) A total of 584 participants with crepitus who had the same Kellgren-Lawrence grade on both knees were matched for gender, body mass index and Kellgren-Lawrence grade to participants without crepitus on both knees. (B) 361 participants with crepitus in only one knee and with the same Kellgren-Lawrence grade classification on both knees were included.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

A - Self-reported function, pain, quality of life, 20-m walk test and chair-stand test. B -Knee extensor and flexor strength, self-reported function and pain.

RESULTS:

A - Individuals with crepitus had lower self-reported function, quality of life and higher pain compared to those without crepitus (3-11%; small effect=0.17-0.41, respectively). No difference was found in objective function between groups. B - Self-reported function was lower in the limb with crepitus compared to the limb without crepitus (15%; trivial effect=0.09). No difference was found in pain and knee strength between-groups.

CONCLUSION(S):

Individuals with knee osteoarthritis and knee crepitus have slightly lower self-reported physical function and knee-related quality of life (small or trivial effect). However, the presence of knee crepitus is not associated with objective function or knee strength.

KEYWORDS:

Knee; Knee osteoarthritis; Quality of life; Recovery of function

PMID:
30471964
DOI:
10.1016/j.bjpt.2018.11.001

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