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Clin Drug Investig. 2018 Nov 23. doi: 10.1007/s40261-018-0732-3. [Epub ahead of print]

Comparison of Skin Cancer Incidence in Caucasian and Non-Caucasian Liver Vs. Lung Transplant Recipients: A Tale of Two Regimens.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, University of Southern California, 1975 Zonal Ave, Los Angeles, CA, 90033, USA. Cohenbrand@gmail.com.
2
School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
3
Department of Pharmacy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
4
Department of Hepatology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
5
Department of Pulmonology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.
6
Department of Dermatology, University of Southern California, 1975 Zonal Ave, Los Angeles, CA, 90033, USA.
7
Rose Salter Medical Research Foundation, Newport Coast, CA, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Organ transplantation is a significant risk factor for the development of skin cancer. The impact of skin type, immunosuppressive regimens, and photosensitizing agents requires further study.

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of this study was to compare skin cancer development between Caucasian and non-Caucasian transplant recipients at the University of Southern California.

METHODS:

We performed a retrospective chart review of lung and liver transplantations to determine the incidence of post-transplant skin cancer. Participants included patients who underwent lung or liver transplantation between 2005 and 2013 at our institution. Patients included in the study were limited to those who survived through the study observation period.

RESULTS:

We analyzed 475 patients who underwent transplantation, including 370 liver transplant recipients and 105 lung transplant recipients. Among these, 46.3% identified as Caucasian, while 53.7% were non-Caucasian. Over a mean follow-up of 7.9 years, 11.8% of Caucasian patients developed at least one skin cancer, compared with 2.7% of non-Caucasians (p < 0.001). However, irrespective of race, skin cancer development was significantly greater in lung compared with liver transplant recipients (20.0% vs. 3.2%, p < 0.001). The standard immunosuppressive and prophylactic regimens were mycophenolate mofetil and tacrolimus based for both transplants. Mycophenolate mofetil was maintained throughout the course in lung transplant patients, whereas this agent was reduced and terminated when possible in liver transplant recipients. In addition, during the years examined, voriconazole, a known photosensitizing agent, was used in lung transplant recipients to prevent aspergillosis.

CONCLUSIONS:

Fair skin type increases post-transplant skin cancer development, irrespective of the immunosuppressive regimen. A higher risk of skin cancer is associated with different regimens; in particular photosensitizing agents may increase risk in transplant recipients.

PMID:
30471069
DOI:
10.1007/s40261-018-0732-3

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