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J Neurooncol. 2018 Dec;140(3):739-748. doi: 10.1007/s11060-018-03007-9. Epub 2018 Nov 23.

Antiepileptic and psychiatric medication in a nationwide cohort of patients with glioma WHO grade II-IV.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen, Post Box 7804, 5020, Bergen, Norway. Kristin.Knudsen-Baas@uib.no.
2
Department of Registration, Cancer Registry of Norway, Ullernchausseen 64, Oslo, 0379, Norway.
3
Department of Research and Innovation, Møre and Romsdal Hospital Trust, Post Box 1600, 6026, Ålesund, Norway.
4
Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, Jonas Lies vei 65, 5021, Bergen, Norway.
5
Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen, Post Box 7804, 5020, Bergen, Norway.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Glioma is the most common intracranial primary brain tumor. Patients with glioma often suffer from epilepsy, anxiety and depression. Aims of this study were to identify risk factors for drug-treated anxiety and depression, and to determine the use of psychiatric medication in a national glioma cohort.

METHODS:

Data from the Cancer Registry of Norway on all persons diagnosed with glioma WHO grade II-IV 2004-2010 were linked with data from the Norwegian Prescription Database. Cox regression analysis was used to assess risk factors for drug-treated anxiety and depression. Standardized incidence ratios were calculated for psychiatric medication dispensed to glioma patients and compared to the general population.

RESULTS:

The glioma cohort consisted of 1056 males and 772 females. Of the 1828 patients, 565 had glioma grade II-III, and 1263 had grade IV. The patients with glioma grade II-III who were treated with levetiracetam had an increased risk for drug-treated anxiety compared to patients without levetiracetam; hazard ratio 2.8 (95% confidence interval 1.7-4.9). Female gender increased the risk for drug-treated anxiety compared to males in patients with glioma grade IV; hazard ratio 1.5 (95% confidence interval 1.2-2.0). Antidepressants were less frequently dispensed to patients with glioma grade II-III and epilepsy than to the general population.

CONCLUSIONS:

Patients with glioma grade II-III on levetiracetam had an increased risk for drug-treated anxiety. The subgroup of patients with glioma grade II-III and epilepsy received less antidepressants than the general population.

KEYWORDS:

Antiepileptic drugs; Anxiety; Depression; Epilepsy; Glioma

PMID:
30471051
DOI:
10.1007/s11060-018-03007-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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