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Nat Commun. 2018 Nov 23;9(1):4944. doi: 10.1038/s41467-018-07515-0.

Studies into the mechanism of measles-associated immune suppression during a measles outbreak in the Netherlands.

Author information

1
Department of Viroscience, Postgraduate School of Molecular Medicine, Erasmus MC, University Medical Centre Rotterdam, Wytemaweg 80, 3015 CN, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
2
Department of Paediatrics, Postgraduate School of Molecular Medicine, Erasmus MC, University Medical Centre Rotterdam, Wytemaweg 80, 3015 CN, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
3
Centre for Infectious Disease Control, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Antonie van Leeuwenhoeklaan 9, 3721 MA, Bilthoven, The Netherlands.
4
ENPICOM BV, 's-Hertogenbosch, 5211 AX, The Netherlands.
5
Department of Immunology, Postgraduate School of Molecular Medicine, Erasmus MC, University Medical Centre Rotterdam, Wytemaweg 80, 3015 CN, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
6
Department of Immunology and Pathology, Monash University, and The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, VIC 3004, Australia.
7
Research Centre for Emerging Infections and Zoonoses, University of Veterinary Medicine (TiHo-RIZ), Hannover, 30559, Germany.
8
Department of Viroscience, Postgraduate School of Molecular Medicine, Erasmus MC, University Medical Centre Rotterdam, Wytemaweg 80, 3015 CN, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. r.deswart@erasmusmc.nl.

Abstract

Measles causes a transient immune suppression, leading to increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections. In experimentally infected non-human primates (NHPs) measles virus (MV) infects and depletes pre-existing memory lymphocytes, causing immune amnesia. A measles outbreak in the Dutch Orthodox Protestant community provided a unique opportunity to study the pathogenesis of measles immune suppression in unvaccinated children. In peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of prodromal measles patients, we detected MV-infected memory CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and naive and memory B cells at similar levels as those observed in NHPs. In paired PBMC collected before and after measles we found reduced frequencies of circulating memory B cells and increased frequencies of regulatory T cells and transitional B cells after measles. These data support our immune amnesia hypothesis and offer an explanation for the previously observed long-term effects of measles on host resistance. This study emphasises the importance of maintaining high measles vaccination coverage.

PMID:
30470742
PMCID:
PMC6251901
DOI:
10.1038/s41467-018-07515-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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