Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Pharm Sci. 2019 Apr;108(4):1506-1511. doi: 10.1016/j.xphs.2018.10.066. Epub 2018 Nov 20.

Particle Size Distribution Analysis of OTC Aerosol or Powder Drug Products With Potential for Inadvertent Inhalation Exposure to Consumers.

Author information

1
Division of Pharmaceutical Analysis, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, St. Louis, Missouri 63110. Electronic address: Xiaofei.Liu@fda.hhs.gov.
2
Division of Nonprescription Drug Products, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993.
3
Division of Pharmaceutical Analysis, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, St. Louis, Missouri 63110.

Abstract

The potential for inadvertent inhalation of over-the-counter (OTC) aerosol/powder drug products for topical application requires understanding of the characteristic size distributions of the airborne particles or droplets generated when these products are used as per the directions on the product label. Particle/droplet size is an important factor in determining the depth of particle penetration into the respiratory system after inhalation. Because particles penetrating beyond the larynx into the lung may lead to adverse respiratory effects, OTC aerosol or powder drug product particle size distribution is important to characterize. In this study, laser diffraction was used to analyze the particle size distribution of 32 currently marketed OTC drug products as emitted after actuation or air dispersion from their final package. Among the products surveyed were sunscreens, antiperspirants, topical analgesics, skin protectants, and acne products. The results may be useful to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in its mission to protect as well as promote public health.

KEYWORDS:

aerosols; light scattering; over-the-counter drug products; particle sizing; powders

PMID:
30468827
DOI:
10.1016/j.xphs.2018.10.066

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center