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BMC Cardiovasc Disord. 2018 Nov 21;18(1):213. doi: 10.1186/s12872-018-0947-5.

Association of sleep problems with neuroendocrine hormones and coagulation factors in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

Author information

1
Department of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry and Psychosomatic Medicine, University Hospital Zurich, Culmannstrasse 8, CH-8091, Zurich, Switzerland. roland.vonkaenel@usz.ch.
2
Department of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry and Psychosomatic Medicine, University Hospital Zurich, Culmannstrasse 8, CH-8091, Zurich, Switzerland.
3
Department of Cardiology, Clinic Barmelweid, Barmelweid, Switzerland.
4
Complementary and Integrative Medicine, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
5
Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
6
Medical Faculty, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
7
Department of Psychiatry, Clienia Schlössli AG, Oetwil am See, Switzerland.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and insomnia are frequent sleep problems that are associated with poor prognosis in patients with coronary heart disease. The mechanisms linking poor sleep with an increased cardiovascular risk are incompletely understood. We examined whether a high risk of OSA as well as insomnia symptoms are associated with neuroendocrine hormones and coagulation factors in patients admitted with acute myocardial infarction.

METHODS:

We assessed 190 patients (mean age 60 years, 83% men) in terms of OSA risk (STOP screening tool for the assessment of high vs. low OSA risk) and severity of insomnia symptoms (Jenkins Sleep Scale for the assessment of subjective sleep difficulties) within 48 h of an acute coronary intervention. Circulating concentrations of epinephrine, norepinephrine, cortisol, fibrinogen, D-dimer, and von Willebrand factor were measured the next morning. The association of OSA risk and insomnia symptoms with neuroendocrine hormones and coagulation factors was computed using multivariate models adjusting for demographic factors, health behaviors, somatic and psychiatric comorbidities, cardiac disease-related variables, and OSA risk in the model for insomnia symptoms, respectively, for insomnia symptoms in the model for OSA risk.

RESULTS:

High OSA risk was identified in 41% of patients and clinically relevant insomnia symptoms were reported by 27% of patients. Compared to those with low OSA risk, patients with high OSA risk had lower levels of epinephrine (p = 0.015), norepinephrine (p = 0.049) and cortisol (p = 0.001). More severe insomnia symptoms were associated with higher levels of fibrinogen (p = 0.037), driven by difficulties initiating sleep, and with lower levels of norepinephrine (p = 0.024), driven by difficulties maintaining sleep.

CONCLUSIONS:

In patients with acute myocardial infarction, sleep problems are associated with neuroendocrine hormones and coagulation activity. The pattern of these relationships is not uniform for patients with a high risk of OSA and those with insomnia symptoms, and whether they contribute to adverse cardiovascular outcomes needs to be established.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01781247 .

KEYWORDS:

Acute coronary syndrome; Biomarker; Blood coagulation; HPA axis; Insomnia; Sleep apnea; Sympathetic nervous system

PMID:
30463526
PMCID:
PMC6249741
DOI:
10.1186/s12872-018-0947-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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