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PLoS One. 2018 Nov 21;13(11):e0207591. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0207591. eCollection 2018.

Association between sleep-disordered breathing and breast cancer aggressiveness.

Author information

1
Respiratory Department, Hospital Universitario de Valme, Sevilla, Spain.
2
Instituto de Biomedicina de Sevilla (IBIS), Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla, Spain.
3
CIBERES. Instituto de Salud Carlos III. Madrid, Spain.
4
Respiratory Department, Hospital Universitario y Politécnico La Fé, Valencia, Spain.
5
Oncology Department, Hospital Universitario de Valme, Sevilla, Spain.
6
Breast cancer Unit. Hospital Universitario y Politécnico La Fé, Valencia, Spain.
7
Biostatistics Unit. Hospital Universitario de Valme, Sevilla, Spain.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) has been associated with cancer aggressiveness, but studies focused on specific tumors are lacking. In this pilot study we investigated whether SDB is associated with breast cancer (BC) aggressiveness.

METHODS:

83 consecutive women <65 years diagnosed with primary BC underwent a home respiratory polygraphy. Markers of SDB severity included the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) and the 4% oxygen desaturation index (ODI4). The Ki67 proliferation index, lack of hormone receptors (HR-), Nottingham Histological Grade (NHG), and tumor stage were used as markers of BC aggressiveness. The association between SDB and molecular subtypes of BC was also assessed.

RESULTS:

The mean (SD) age was 48.8 (8.8) years and body mass index was 27.4 (5.4) Kg/m2. 42 women (50.6%) were post-menopausal. The median (IQR) AHI was 5.1 (2-9.4), and ODI4 was 1.5 (0.5-5.8). The median (IQR) AHI did not differ between the groups with Ki67>28% and Ki67<29% [5.1 (2.6-8.3) vs 5.0 (1.5-10), p = 0.89)], HR- and HR+ [5.7 (1.6-12.4) vs 4.9 (2-9.4), p = 0.68], NHG (Grade3, Grade2, and Grade1; p = 0.86), tumor stage (stage III-IV, stage II, and stage I; p = 0.62), or molecular subtypes (Luminal A, Luminal B, HER2, and triple negative; p = 0.90). The prevalence of an AHI≥5 did not differ between the groups with Ki67>28% and Ki67<29% (51.2% vs 52.3%, p = 0.90), HR- and HR+ (58.3% vs 49.1%, p = 0.47), NHG categories (p = 0.89), different tumor stages (p = 0.71), or molecular subtypes (p = 0.73). These results did not change when the ODI4 was used instead of the AHI.

CONCLUSION:

Our results do not support an association between the presence or severity of SDB and BC aggressiveness.

PMID:
30462710
PMCID:
PMC6248981
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0207591
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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