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Nicotine Tob Res. 2018 Nov 21. doi: 10.1093/ntr/nty252. [Epub ahead of print]

Evaluation of a Systems-Based Tobacco Cessation Program Using Bedside Volunteers.

Author information

1
Acute Medicine, Christiana Care Health System, Newark, DE.
2
Value Institute, Christiana Care Health System, Newark, DE.
3
College of Health Sciences, University of Delaware, Newark, DE.
4
Center for Heart & Vascular Health, Christiana Care Health System, Newark, DE.
5
Volunteer Services, Christiana Care Health System, Newark, DE.

Abstract

Introduction:

Hospitalization and post-discharge provides an opportune time for tobacco cessation. This study tested the feasibility, uptake, and cessation outcomes of a hospital-based tobacco cessation program, delivered by volunteers to the bedside with post-discharge referral to Quitline services. Patient characteristics associated with Quitline uptake and cessation were assessed.

Methods:

Between February and November 2016, trained hospital volunteers approached inpatient tobacco users on six pilot units. Volunteers shared a cessation brochure and used the ASK-ADVISE-CONNECT model to connect ready-to-quit patients to the Delaware Quitline via fax-referral. Volunteers administered a follow-up survey to all admitted tobacco users via telephone or email at 3-months post-discharge.

Results:

Of the 743 admitted tobacco users, 531 (72%) were visited by a volunteer, and 97% (531/547) of those approached, accepted the visit. Over one third (201/531; 38%) were ready-to-quit and fax-referred to the Quitline, and 36% of those referred accepted Quitline services. At 3-months post discharge, 37% (135/368) reported not using tobacco in the last 30 days; intent-to-treat cessation rate was 18% (135/743). In a multivariable regression model of Quitline fax-referral completion, receiving NRT during hospitalization was the strongest predictor (OR: 1.97; 95% CI: 1.34-2.90). In a model of 3-month cessation, receiving Quitline services (OR: 3.21, 95%CI: 1.35-7.68) and having coronary artery disease (OR: 2.28; 95% CI: 1.11-4.68) were associated with tobacco cessation, but a volunteer visit was not.

Conclusions:

An "opt-out" tobacco cessation service using trained volunteers is feasible for connecting patients to Quitline services.

PMID:
30462274
DOI:
10.1093/ntr/nty252

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