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J Am Acad Audiol. 2018 Sep 25. doi: 10.3766/jaaa.17113. [Epub ahead of print]

Early Indices of Reduced Cochlear Function in Young Adults with Type-1 Diabetes Revealed by DPOAE Fine Structure.

Author information

1
Department of Otolaryngology and Communicative Sciences, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS.
2
Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences, The Graduate Center of City University of New York, New York, NY.
3
Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The relationship between type-1 diabetes mellitus (DM) and cochlear dysfunction remains inconclusive.

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study was to examine otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) in normal-hearing young adults with type-1 DM as compared with matched controls and identify potential covariates influencing OAE findings.

RESEARCH DESIGN:

Cross-sectional study.

STUDY SAMPLE:

N = 40 young adults aged 18-28 years including individuals with type-1 DM (n = 20) and age-gender matched controls (n = 20) with normal hearing sensitivity.

DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS:

Measures of pure-tone threshold sensitivity and OAEs, including distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs), transient evoked OAEs, and DPOAE fine structure, were compared between groups. Covariates such as noise exposure and DM-related factors (e.g., duration of disease, glycated hemoglobin levels) were considered. Statistical analysis included analysis of variance and linear regression.

RESULTS:

Measures of hearing sensitivity and auditory function in both groups were comparable for all assays, except DPOAE fine structure. A reduced number of fine structure peaks and component amplitudes were found in the type-1 diabetes DM group with the primary difference in the reflection component.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results indicate that reduced cochlear function in young adults with type-1 DM can be revealed using DPOAE fine structure, suggesting potential clinical applications of DPOAE fine structure in early identification of cochlear pathology. Potential factors underlying these findings are discussed.

PMID:
30461415
DOI:
10.3766/jaaa.17113

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