Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Eye (Lond). 2019 Apr;33(4):610-618. doi: 10.1038/s41433-018-0251-8. Epub 2018 Nov 20.

Ophthalmology research in the UK's National Health Service: the structure and performance of the NIHR's Ophthalmology research portfolio.

Author information

1
Wolverhampton Eye Infirmary, The Royal Wolverhampton Hospitals NHS Trust, Wolverhampton, UK.
2
Manchester Royal Eye Hospital, Manchester, UK.
3
National Institute for Health Research (NIHR CRN), University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.
4
Academic Unit of Ophthalmology, York NHS Teaching Hospital, York, UK.
5
Department of Health Sciences, University of York, Heslington, UK.
6
NIHR Moorfields Biomedical Research Centre, London, UK.
7
Bradford Teaching Hospitals, Bradford, UK.
8
Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK.
9
Department of Paediatric Rheumatology, Alder Hey Children's NHS Foundation Trust, Liverpool, UK.
10
Queen's University of Belfast, Belfast, UK.
11
Cambridge University Hospitals, Cambridge, UK. rb@rupertbourne.co.uk.
12
Vision & Eye Research Unit, School of Medicine, Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge, UK. rb@rupertbourne.co.uk.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To report on the composition and performance of the portfolio of Ophthalmology research studies in the United Kingdom's National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Clinical Research Network (UK CRN).

METHODS:

Ophthalmology studies open to recruitment between 1 April 2010 and 31 March 2018 were classified by: sub-specialty, participant age, gender of Chief Investigator, involvement of genetic investigations, commercial/ non-commercial, interventional/observational design. Frequency distributions for each covariate and temporal variation in recruitment to time and target were analysed.

RESULTS:

Over 8 years, 137,377 participants were recruited (average of 15,457 participants/year; range: 5485-32,573) with growth by year in proportion of commercial studies and hospital participation in England (76% in 2017/18). Fourteen percent of studies had a genetic component and most studies (82%) included only adults. The majority of studies (41%) enrolled patients with retinal diseases, followed by glaucoma (17%), anterior segment and cataract (13%), and ocular inflammation (6%). Overall, 68% of non-commercial studies and 55% of commercial studies recruited within the anticipated time set by the study and also recruited to or exceeded the target number of participants.

CONCLUSIONS:

High levels of clinical research activity, growth and improved performance have been observed in Ophthalmology in UK over the past 8 years. Some sub-specialties that carry substantial morbidity and a very high burden on NHS services are underrepresented and deserve more patient-centred research. Yet the NIHR and its CRN Ophthalmology National Specialty Group has enabled key steps in achieving the goal of embedding research into every day clinical care.

PMID:
30459469
PMCID:
PMC6461943
[Available on 2020-04-01]
DOI:
10.1038/s41433-018-0251-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group
Loading ...
Support Center