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BMC Vet Res. 2018 Nov 20;14(1):357. doi: 10.1186/s12917-018-1669-8.

Application of different laboratory techniques to monitor the behaviour of a Mycoplasma synoviae vaccine (MS-H) in broiler breeders.

Author information

1
Department of Animal Medicine Production and Health - MAPS, Università degli Studi di Padova, Viale dell'Università 16, 35020. Legnaro, Padova, Italy. mlmoronato@gmail.com.
2
Avian Medicine Laboratory Mycoplasma Unit - SCT1, Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Venezie, Viale dell'Università 10, 35020. Legnaro, Padova, Italy. mlmoronato@gmail.com.
3
Department of Animal Medicine Production and Health - MAPS, Università degli Studi di Padova, Viale dell'Università 16, 35020. Legnaro, Padova, Italy.
4
Veterinary practitioner. Avicola Alimentare Monteverde SRL. Via San Donato, 107, 25038. Rovato, Brescia, Italy.
5
Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale di Verona, SCT1, Via S. Giacomo 5, 37135, Verona, Italy.
6
Avian Medicine Laboratory Mycoplasma Unit - SCT1, Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale delle Venezie, Viale dell'Università 10, 35020. Legnaro, Padova, Italy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Mycoplasma synoviae (MS) is a major poultry pathogen which causes severe economic losses in all the productive sectors. The prevalence of MS in European countries has increased in the last few years, leading to greater attention to the available methods to prevent its spread. The main strategy currently applied for its containment is the development and maintenance of MS-free breeder flocks. A live MS vaccine (MS-H) obtained by mutagenizing an Australian field strain has recently been introduced in Italy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the vaccine behaviour in broiler breeder groups at different production stages and the effectiveness of the available laboratory tests in discriminating the MS-H from a field strain.

RESULTS:

The vaccine diffused extensively through the population, shown by the wide serological response (over 80% of positive samples in RSA and 85% in ELISA), the high serological titres, the positivity of all the tracheal samples collected during the production phase by MS PCR and the positivity by cultivation from tracheal swabs at the end-point (55 weeks after vaccination). In contrast, only one swab from a sternal bursa was positive in MS PCR, while all the joint and oviduct samples were negative. There was no evidence of vertical transmission. Different genotyping techniques were used to achieve a clear classification of the MS positive samples. The vlhA and the obg gene analysis showed that most of the strains were homologous with the vaccine, but some ambiguous samples were further investigated with the multi locus sequence typing (MLST) scheme which confirmed the homology.

CONCLUSIONS:

The development of a multi-technique approach to monitor vaccinated avian flocks, based both on serological and biomolecular methods, is advised as well as the use of effective genotyping techniques to analyse the MS strains circulating in high densely populated poultry areas.

KEYWORDS:

Chicken breeder; Genotyping; MS-H; Monitoring; Mycoplasma synoviae

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