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BMC Public Health. 2018 Nov 20;18(1):1281. doi: 10.1186/s12889-018-6133-y.

A workplace intervention to reduce alcohol and drug consumption: a nonrandomized single-group study.

Author information

1
Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Facultat de Medicina i Ciències de la Salut, Functional Nutrition, Oxidation, and Cardiovascular Diseases Group (NFOC-Salut), Health Education and Promotion, Reus, Spain.
2
Medical service of Fomento de Construcciones y Contratas, Delegación Catalunya II, 43007, Tarragona, Spain.
3
Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Facultat de Medicina i Ciències de la Salut, Functional Nutrition, Oxidation, and Cardiovascular Diseases Group (NFOC-Salut), Health Education and Promotion, Reus, Spain. lucia.tarro@urv.cat.
4
Eurecat, Centre Tecnològic de Catalunya, Unitat de Nutrició i Salut, Reus, Spain. lucia.tarro@urv.cat.
5
Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Facultat de Medicina i Ciències de la Salut, Functional Nutrition, Oxidation, and Cardiovascular Diseases Group (NFOC-Salut), Health Education and Promotion, Reus, Spain. elisabet.llaurado@urv.cat.
6
Eurecat, Centre Tecnològic de Catalunya, Unitat de Nutrició i Salut, Reus, Spain.
7
Hospital Universitari Sant Joan de Reus, Reus, Spain.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The consumption of alcohol and other drugs causes social and health problems in industrialized societies. Furthermore, alcohol and drug consumption in the workplace is associated with work accidents, absenteeism and low productivity. The aim of the current study is to reduce alcohol and drug consumption among workers in the service industry and, as a secondary aim, to improve their healthy habits through the reduction of alcohol and other drug consumption in their leisure time.

METHODS:

This nonrandomized, single-group study was conducted in 12 work centers. The intervention began in 2009 and emphasized 1) health promotion and health monitoring, which included a) alcohol and drug awareness and b) the evaluation and monitoring of alcohol and drug consumption through a semistructured interview designed to assess risky consumption; urine tests aimed at detecting alcohol, cannabis and cocaine use; an Alcotest based on expired air to test for the recent consumption of alcohol and a saliva exam to test for the recent consumption of six drugs; and 2) secondary prevention if risky consumption was identified. Risky alcohol consumption was defined as the ingestion of more than 28 standard drink units (SDUs)/week among men and more than 17 SDUs/week among women (taking into account both work and leisure time). Drug consumption was considered risky consumption.

RESULTS:

A total of 1103 workers participated, and each received 5 h of awareness training. Those who presented with risky consumption received secondary prevention training. The prevalence of risky alcohol consumption decreased by 4.1% (baseline: 14.7% reduced to 10.6% in the first year; p = 0.001), a reduction that was maintained over a 3-year follow-up period.

CONCLUSION:

A comprehensive program of worker health surveillance that involves stakeholders and includes monitoring can be a means of potentially improving compliance with workplace promotion programs, resulting in the facilitation of such beneficial, desired behavior change in areas such as alcohol and drug consumption.

KEYWORDS:

Drug prevention; Drugs; Habits; Health; Health behavior surveillance; Healthy living; Labor sphere; Risky behaviors; Work

PMID:
30458742
PMCID:
PMC6247683
DOI:
10.1186/s12889-018-6133-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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