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Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2019 Jan 29;63(2). pii: e01384-18. doi: 10.1128/AAC.01384-18. Print 2019 Feb.

Examination of Fluconazole-Induced Alopecia in an Animal Model and Human Cohort.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of California, Davis, Davis, California, USA grthompson@ucdavis.edu.
2
Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, University of California Davis Medical Center, Davis, California, USA.
3
Department of Nutritional Sciences and Toxicology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California, USA.
4
Department of Pathology, Microbiology, and Immunology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, Davis, California, USA.
5
Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, Davis, California, USA.
6
Department of Dermatology, Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra Northwell, Hempstead, New York, USA.
7
Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of California, Davis, Davis, California, USA.
8
Department of Pathology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas, USA.
9
Department of Pharmacology, University of California, Davis, Davis, California, USA.

Abstract

Fluconazole-induced alopecia is a significant problem for patients receiving long-term therapy. We evaluated the hair cycle changes of fluconazole in a rat model and investigated potential molecular mechanisms. Plasma and tissue levels of retinoic acid were not found to be causal. Human patients with alopecia attributed to fluconazole also underwent detailed assessment and in both our murine model and human cohort fluconazole induced telogen effluvium. Future work further examining the mechanism of fluconazole-induced alopecia should be undertaken.

KEYWORDS:

alopecia; antifungal; fluconazole; side effect

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