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Pediatr Clin North Am. 2019 Feb;66(1):15-30. doi: 10.1016/j.pcl.2018.08.003.

Approach to the Child with Hematuria.

Author information

1
Pediatric Nephrology, Children's Hospital at Montefiore, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 3415 Bainbridge Avenue, Bronx, NY 10467, USA.
2
Pediatric Nephrology, Children's Hospital at Montefiore, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 3415 Bainbridge Avenue, Bronx, NY 10467, USA. Electronic address: kreidy@montefiore.org.

Abstract

The causes of macroscopic and microscopic hematuria overlap; both are often caused by urinary tract infections or urethral/bladder irritation. Coexistent hypertension and proteinuria should prompt investigation for glomerular disease. The most common glomerulonephritis in children is postinfectious glomerulonephritis. In most patients, and especially with isolated microscopic hematuria, the diagnostic workup reveals no clear underlying cause. In those cases whereby a diagnosis is made, the most common causes of persistent microscopic hematuria are thin basement membrane nephropathy, immunoglobulin A nephropathy, or idiopathic hypercalciuria. Treatment and long-term prognosis varies with the underlying disease.

KEYWORDS:

Glomerulonephritis; Gross hematuria; Hematuria; Hypercalciuria; Macroscopic; Microscopic hematuria; Red blood cells; Thin basement membrane nephropathy

PMID:
30454740
DOI:
10.1016/j.pcl.2018.08.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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