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Mutat Res. 2018 Oct - Dec;778:23-37. doi: 10.1016/j.mrrev.2018.08.002. Epub 2018 Aug 17.

DNA damage in obesity: Initiator, promoter and predictor of cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Westminster, 115 New Cavendish Street, London W1W 6UW, UK.
2
Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Westminster, 115 New Cavendish Street, London W1W 6UW, UK. Electronic address: e.volpi@westminster.ac.uk.

Abstract

Epidemiological evidence linking obesity with increased risk of cancer is steadily growing, although the causative aspects underpinning this association are only partially understood. Obesity leads to a physiological imbalance in the regulation of adipose tissue and its normal functioning, resulting in hyperglycaemia, dyslipidaemia and inflammation. These states promote the generation of oxidative stress, which is exacerbated in obesity by a decline in anti-oxidant defence systems. Oxidative stress can have a marked impact on DNA, producing mutagenic lesions that could prove carcinogenic. Here we review the current evidence for genomic instability, sustained DNA damage and accelerated genome ageing in obesity. We explore the notion of genotoxicity, ensuing from systemic oxidative stress, as a key oncogenic factor in obesity. Finally, we advocate for early, pre-malignant assessment of genome integrity and stability to inform surveillance strategies and interventions.

KEYWORDS:

Cancer; DNA damage; Inflammation; Obesity; Oxidative stress

PMID:
30454680
DOI:
10.1016/j.mrrev.2018.08.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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