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Nutrients. 2018 Nov 18;10(11). pii: E1793. doi: 10.3390/nu10111793.

Gut Permeability Might be Improved by Dietary Fiber in Individuals with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) Undergoing Weight Reduction.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine II, Saarland University Medical Center, Saarland University, 66421 Homburg, Germany. marcin.krawczyk@uks.eu.
2
Laboratory of Metabolic Liver Diseases, Centre for Preclinical Research, Department of General, Transplant and Liver Surgery, Medical University of Warsaw, 02-097 Warsaw, Poland. marcin.krawczyk@uks.eu.
3
Department of Biochemistry and Human Nutrition, Pomeranian Medical University, 71-210 Szczecin, Poland. domi.maciejka@wp.pl.
4
Department of Biochemistry and Human Nutrition, Pomeranian Medical University, 71-210 Szczecin, Poland. ryterska.karina@gmail.com.
5
Department of Biochemistry and Human Nutrition, Pomeranian Medical University, 71-210 Szczecin, Poland. majaczerwinska89@gmail.com.
6
Department of Biochemistry and Human Nutrition, Pomeranian Medical University, 71-210 Szczecin, Poland. dominikajamiol@interia.pl.
7
Department of Biochemistry and Human Nutrition, Pomeranian Medical University, 71-210 Szczecin, Poland. karzyd@pum.edu.pl.
8
Liver and Internal Medicine Unit, Department of General, Transplant and Liver Surgery of the Medical University of Warsaw, 02-097 Warsaw, Poland. p.milkiewicz@wp.pl.
9
Translational Medicine Group, Pomeranian Medical University, 71-210 Szczecin, Poland. p.milkiewicz@wp.pl.
10
Liver and Internal Medicine Unit, Department of General, Transplant and Liver Surgery of the Medical University of Warsaw, 02-097 Warsaw, Poland. jorasz@gmail.com.
11
Department of Biochemistry and Human Nutrition, Pomeranian Medical University, 71-210 Szczecin, Poland. ewa.stachowska@pum.edu.pl.

Abstract

(1) Introduction: Zonulin (ZO) has been proposed as a marker of intestinal permeability. Only a few studies have analyzed to date how diet influences the serum concentration of ZO among patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). We performed a six-month dietetic intervention to evaluate the association between fiber intake and ZO concentration in 32 individuals with NAFLD. (2) Methods: Fiber content in the diet was estimated by Food Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) and by analyzing 72-h nutritional diaries. ZO concentrations in serum were measured before and after the intervention by immunoenzymatic assay (ELISA). Fatty liver was quantified using the Hamaguchi score before and after the dietetic intervention. (3) Results: During the intervention, the dietary fiber intake increased from 19 g/day to the 29 g/day concomitant with an increase in the frequency of fiber consumption. All patients experienced significant (all p < 0.05) improvements in serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGTP) activities. We also detected decreased serum triglycerides (p = 0.036), homeostatic model assessment insulin resistance (HOMA-IR (p = 0.041) and insulin content (p = 0.34), and improvement of fatty liver status according to the Hamaguchi score (p = 0.009). ZO concentration in serum decreased by nearly 90% (7.335 ± 13.492 vs. 0.507 ± 0.762 ng/mL, p = 0.001) and correlated with the amount of dietary fiber intake (p = 0.043) as well as the degree of fatty liver (p = 0.037). (4) Conclusion: Increasing nutritional fiber results in reduced serum ZO levels, reduced liver enzymes and improved hepatic steatosis in patients with NAFLD, possibly by altering intestinal permeability. Increased dietary fiber intake should be recommended in patients with NAFLD.

KEYWORDS:

NAFLD; diet; fiber; zonulin

PMID:
30453660
PMCID:
PMC6266494
DOI:
10.3390/nu10111793
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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