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Nat Commun. 2018 Nov 19;9(1):4878. doi: 10.1038/s41467-018-07318-3.

Flow of cerebrospinal fluid is driven by arterial pulsations and is reduced in hypertension.

Author information

1
Center for Translational Neuromedicine, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, 14642, USA.
2
Department of Neuroscience, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, 14642, USA.
3
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, 14627, USA.
4
China Medical University, Shenyang, 110122, China.
5
Center for Translational Neuromedicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, 2200, Copenhagen, Denmark.
6
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, 14627, USA. d.h.kelley@rochester.edu.

Abstract

Flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) through perivascular spaces (PVSs) in the brain is important for clearance of metabolic waste. Arterial pulsations are thought to drive flow, but this has never been quantitatively shown. We used particle tracking to quantify CSF flow velocities in PVSs of live mice. CSF flow is pulsatile and driven primarily by the cardiac cycle. The speed of the arterial wall matches that of the CSF, suggesting arterial wall motion is the principal driving mechanism, via a process known as perivascular pumping. Increasing blood pressure leaves the artery diameter unchanged but changes the pulsations of the arterial wall, increasing backflow and thereby reducing net flow in the PVS. Perfusion-fixation alters the normal flow direction and causes a 10-fold reduction in PVS size. We conclude that particle tracking velocimetry enables the study of CSF flow in unprecedented detail and that studying the PVS in vivo avoids fixation artifacts.

PMID:
30451853
PMCID:
PMC6242982
DOI:
10.1038/s41467-018-07318-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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