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Yonsei Med J. 2018 Dec;59(10):1197-1204. doi: 10.3349/ymj.2018.59.10.1197.

The Brain Donation Program in South Korea.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.
2
Department of Neurology, Kangwon National University Hospital, Kangwon National University College of Medicine, Chuncheon, Korea.
3
Department of Pathology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. yl.suh@samsung.com.
4
Department of Pathology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.
5
Administarative Office, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon, Korea.
6
Neuroscience Center, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.
7
Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chuncheon, Korea.
8
Department of Forensic Medicine, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan, Korea.
9
Department of Neurology, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan, Korea.
10
Department of Neurology, Jeju National University College of Medicine, Jeju, Korea.
11
Department of Forensic Medicine, Jeju National University College of Medicine, Jeju, Korea.
12
Division of Brain Diseases, Center for Biomedical Sciences, Korea National Institute of Health, Cheongju, Korea.
13
Department of Neurology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Korea.
14
Department of Pathology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju, Korea.
15
Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Brain Science and Engineering Institute, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Korea.
16
Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Ajou University, Suwon, Korea.
17
Memory and Aging Center, Departments of Neurology and Pathology, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.
18
Department of Anatomy & Cell Biology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Suwon, Korea.
19
Department of Neurology, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. sangwonseo@empas.com.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Obtaining brain tissue is critical to definite diagnosis and to furthering understanding of neurodegenerative diseases. The present authors have maintained the National Neuropathology Reference and Diagnostic Laboratories for Dementia in South Korea since 2016. We have built a nationwide brain bank network and are collecting brain tissues from patients with neurodegenerative diseases. We are aiming to facilitate analyses of clinic-pathological and image-pathological correlations of neurodegenerative disease and to broaden understanding thereof.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We recruited participants through two routes: from memory clinics and the community. As a baseline evaluation, clinical interviews, a neurological examination, laboratory tests, neuropsychological tests, and MRI were undertaken. Some patients also underwent amyloid PET.

RESULTS:

We recruited 105 participants, 70 from clinics and 35 from the community. Among them, 11 died and were autopsied. The clinical diagnoses of the autopsied patients included four with Alzheimer's disease (AD), two with subcortical vascular dementia, two with non-fluent variant primary progressive aphasia, one with leukoencephalopathy, one with frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and one with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Five patients underwent amyloid PET: two with AD, one with mixed dementia, one with FTD, and one with CJD.

CONCLUSION:

The clinical and neuropathological information to be obtained from this cohort in the future will provide a deeper understanding of the neuropathological mechanisms of cognitive impairment in Asia, especially Korea.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer's disease; Neuropathology; amyloid; brain autopsy; frontotemporal dementia

PMID:
30450854
PMCID:
PMC6240560
DOI:
10.3349/ymj.2018.59.10.1197
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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