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Semin Cell Dev Biol. 2018 Dec;84:22-29. doi: 10.1016/j.semcdb.2017.12.002. Epub 2018 Oct 8.

The use of proteomics to understand antiviral immunity.

Author information

1
Infection and Immunity Program, Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute and Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800, Australia. Electronic address: amanda.woon@monash.edu.
2
Infection and Immunity Program, Monash Biomedicine Discovery Institute and Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800, Australia. Electronic address: anthony.purcell@monash.edu.

Abstract

Viruses are intracellular pathogens that cause a vast array of diseases, which are often severe and typified by high morbidity and mortality rates. Viral infections continue to be a global health burden and effective vaccines and therapeutics are constantly sought to prevent and treat these infections. The development of such treatments generally relies on understanding the mechanisms that underpin efficient host antiviral immune responses. This review summarises recent developments in our understanding of antiviral adaptive immunity and in particular, highlights the use of mass spectrometry to elucidate viral antigens and their processing and presentation to T cells and other immune effectors. These processed peptides serve as potential vaccine candidates or may facilitate clinical monitoring, diagnosis and immunotherapy of infectious diseases.

KEYWORDS:

Antigen presentation; Antigen processing; Immunopeptidomics; Mass spectrometry; Proteomics; Virus

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